Pop Culture

Is Harry Potter Going To Last Forever?

New books, new movies, new everything. Will Harry Potter mania ever let up?

The last Harry Potter book came out in 2007. The last movie? 2011. Despite this, Harry Potter has more or less remained in the forefront of pop culture, constantly being referenced and expanded upon by the author and fans alike. In a world where there's more content than time and attention spans are short by necessity, J.K. Rowling managed to do the impossible: tell a story that would last.

Harry Potter - as a book series, as a film franchise, as a movement - has had the kind of longevity that other authors could only dream of. (Remember Twilight? Hell, even the fervor behind Game of Thrones is dying down a little these days.) The secret behind her success is seemingly simple: even after the books ended and the movies (the ones based on the original series, anyway) were finished, J.K. Rowling was steadily expanding her universe - and still is.

The stage play Harry Potter and The Cursed Child is easily the most hotly anticipated Harry Potter-related release coming up, and will be premiering at the Palace Theatre in London this summer. Luckily for fans who aren't in the U.K., the script will also be released in book form. The news - announced yesterday - has led many to proclaim that an 8th Harry Potter book is on the way, but HPatCC could more accurately be described as a spin-off; though the play will star Harry, now a husband, father, and employee at the Ministry of Magic, ample attention will be paid to his youngest son Albus as he struggles to live in his father's sizeable shadow. Most importantly, it isn't a novel:

Honestly, Rowling could choose to never revisit the lives of Harry, Ron, and Hermione, and she'd still never run out of material - for books, for plays, for movies, whatever. The upcoming Harry Potter movie may be billed as a Harry Potter prequel, but it won't really feature Harry at all. Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them is set in 1930s America and follows the adventures of magizoologist Newt Scamander, but despite being only tangentially related to the main narrative that fans originally fell in love with, it's still a heavily anticipated film for 2016.

And then there's Pottermore. The online game - or "reading experience" - lets fans further delve into the wizarding world, offering bonus content and info on the wizarding world. Users can get sorted into a house and even take classes at Hogwarts.

It may sound childish to outsiders, but you have to consider the nostalgia factor before you judge. Many fans grew up reading the books - even aged at the same rate the characters did - so to let go of Harry would be to let go of an old friend. By creating an immersive online experience that fans could get lost in (or just check out from time to time), Rowling created a way for her fanbase to keep the magic alive, and in doing so nurtured an environment where new material -a stage play, a movie, maybe even an actual book one day - makes all the sense in the world.

I don't think anything will ever match how things were during the height of Harry's popularity; back then, everything was still new, and that kind of widespread excitement over a book series (children's books, at that) hadn't really been seen before. To put it simply, Rowling struck gold. She crafted a world so immersive that, just like our own, there's no shortage of magic to be found.

It may sound childish to outsiders, but you have to consider the nostalgia factor before you judge. Many fans grew up reading the books - even aged at the same rate the characters did - so to let go of Harry would be to let go of an old friend. By creating an immersive online experience that fans could get lost in (or just check out from time to time), Rowling created a way for her fanbase to keep the magic alive, and in doing so nurtured an environment where new material -a stage play, a movie, maybe even an actual book one day - makes all the sense in the world.

I don't think anything will ever match how things were during the height of Harry's popularity; back then, everything was still new, and that kind of widespread excitement over a book series (children's books, at that) hadn't really been seen before. To put it simply, Rowling struck gold. She crafted a world so immersive that, just like our own, there's no shortage of magic to be found.

All Posts About:
Pop Culture

You May Also Like...

Recommended by Zergnet