POLL: Should N.J. Sheriff's Officer Have Been Fired Over Her Past As A Dominatrix?

Kristen Hyman called her previous career in the fetish industry "stupid stuff [she] did when [she] was a kid," and described it as being "exactly like WWE wrest­ling."

A sheriff's officer in New Jersey was fired from the county sheriff's office after department officials discovered her past as a professional dominatrix.

Before pursuing a career in law enforcement, 30-year-old Kristen Hyman previously worked in the fetish industry, where she was known as "Domina Nyx Blake," The Frisky reports. Over the course of four years, Hyman appeared in a number of bondage films (always fully clothed and never performing any sex acts, she says) and occasionally saw clients privately for money.

After department officials found out about Hyman's work history, she was suspended on May 26, six days before her training academy graduation. A judge later reinstated her, and she was allowed to graduate from the academy on June 8, after which she was placed on paid administrative leave pending an official hearing.

In an interview with The New York Post, Hyman called her previous career in the fetish industry "stupid stuff [she] did when [she] was a kid," and described it as being "exactly like WWE wrest­ling."

"I had a constructed narrative," she continued. "A constructed character. Anything you read involving 'Domina Nyx Blake, the Greek Goddess of the Night,' is creative writing."

A hearing officer made the decision to terminate Hyman on February 7, NJ.com reports, with a source close to the situation stating that the key reason Hyman was fired is because she lied about her prior dominatrix work on her sheriff's office application. The sheriff's office previously described Hyman's dominatrix past as "conduct unbecoming of a federal employee," and claimed that the discovery of her fetish work resulted in "the Hudson County Sheriff's Office being the subject of inquiry and ridicule among law enforcement."

This may not be the end for Hyman's law enforcement career, though; as NJ.com points out, Hyman still has the option to appeal the decision to the state Civil Service Commission.

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