Man Sentenced To 1,000 Years In Prison For Child Porn Is Released On Parole After Serving Just Seven

John H. Cranford, Jr., the district attorney in Coweta County, Georgia, said he had been “powerless to stop” the release of Peter Mallory, a former television station owner who was found with more than 26,000 images of child pornography.

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A Georgia man who received a 1,000-year sentence for possessing more than 26,000 files of child pornography has been released on parole after serving just seven years behind bars.

The George State Board of Pardons and Paroles released Peter Mallory, 72, on May 27 over the objections of the district attorney.

After the release, Coweta Judicial Circuit District Attorney John H. Cranford, Jr. issued a statement saying he had been “powerless to stop” the parole board’s decision.

Mallory, a former LaGrange television station owner, was convicted in 2012 of 64 counts, including sexual exploitation of a child, invasion of privacy and evidence tampering, according to local station WTVM.

LaGrange Police Department arrested Mallory in 2011 after they were alerted to child pornography on an IP address at TV 33, the station Mallory owned.

Peter Mallory

Investigators seized more than 26,000 files of child pornography as part of the investigation, according to The LaGrange Daily News.

Prosecutors said Mallory created and procured child pornography, even filming the genital area of at least three victims, including one child, on a camera he had installed under a work desk.

Cranford had written the parole board in December 2019 to oppose the release.

“While it may be consistent throughout the state for this board to parole certain persons convicted of these crimes after seven years, Mallory is a worse offender and his crimes are worse than the average possessor of child pornography,” he wrote in the letter, according to the local news station.

Cranford had also argued that Mallory was a sexual deviant and would be compelled to continue his compulsive behavior.

“In the current digital age, no amount of supervision can stop a compulsive sexual deviant like Mallory from seeking out the most heinous images and videos of small children being sexually abused,” he wrote. “The facts of this case further show that Mallory is a danger to create such images himself if he cannot obtain them otherwise.”

The parole board sent a letter to Cranford on Jan. 13 telling the district attorney they had “reconsidered this case and established a new tentative parole month of December 2022,” according to local station WXIA-TV.

But Cranford said in his statement that the parole board sent him another letter in April saying the board “decided to proceed with parole in the near future.”

As part of his release conditions, Mallory will be required to register as a sex offender and will remain on parole for the remainder of his 1,000-year sentence, Cranford said.

His parole can be provoked if he violates any conditions of his release or violates the law.

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