Lori Loughlin’s Daughters No Longer Enrolled At USC Amid Admissions Scandal

Loughlin and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, have been accused of paying $500,000 to have their daughters admitted to the University of Southern California as crew team recruits.
 

By Sharon Lynn Pruitt
Lori Loughlin Olivia Jade Isabella Rose Giannulli

As Lori Loughlin and Mossimo Giannulli await trial for their alleged participation in a college admissions bribery scheme, multiple outlets report that the couple’s daughters are no longer enrolled at the university that their parents allegedly paid hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes to get them into.

The University of Southern California Registrar confirmed in a statement obtained by USA TODAY and NBC News that Olivia Jade and Isabella Rose Giannulli are not currently enrolled at the school. No additional information regarding their status was provided, with the university citing student privacy laws, according to the outlet.

Loughlin, 55, and Giannulli, 56, were among dozens of wealthy parents charged earlier this year for allegedly taking part in a multi-level plot wherein well-off couples paid copious amounts in bribe money to ease their children’s paths into top-ranking universities. Federal prosecutors claim that Loughlin and Giannulli paid $500,000 to the confessed mastermind behind the plot, Rick Singer, in order for their daughters to be admitted to USC as crew team recruits despite neither daughter being a student athlete.

Loughlin, an actress known by many as Aunt Becky in “Full House," and Giannulli, a fashion designer, are facing charges of money laundering and conspiracy, but both have pleaded not guilty and reportedly plan to present a “united front” in court. They are scheduled to next appear in court on Jan. 17, 2020 for a status hearing, according to Deadline.

Olivia Jade and Isabella Rose have remained relatively tight-lipped on the matter, although Olivia Jade in particular quickly came under fire for previous comments she made suggesting that higher education was not a priority for her.

Both daughters were enrolled at USC as recently as March, according to a previous statement from the university obtained by USA TODAY.

“USC is conducting a case-by-case review for current students and graduates that may be connected to the scheme alleged by the government and will make informed decisions as those reviews are completed,” that statement reads.

Of the many parents charged, actress Felicity Huffman was the first famous name to be sentenced, having been ordered last month to spend two weeks in prison. The “Desperate Housewives” star admitted to paying $15,000 to have her daughter’s SAT scores altered, and apologized for her actions in a letter to the judge assigned to her case.

Speaking to Boston’s WCVB earlier this month, Andrew Lelling, the U.S Attorney for Massachusetts, applauded Huffman’s handling of the charges, and suggested that Loughlin’s decision to deny any wrongdoing may cost her.

“We will probably ask for a higher sentence for [Loughlin] than we did for Felicity Huffman,” he said. “I can’t tell you exactly what that would be. … It’s tough to tell at this point how it’s going to develop.”

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