Alabama Sheriff Accused Of Having Sex With Underage Girls In The '90s

Etowah County Sheriff Todd Entrekin's allegedly hosted parties for law enforcement friends where underage teens were plied with alcohol and drugs. 

An Alabama sheriff, who already achieved notoriety earlier this year for admitting to pocketing more than $750,000 in funds that were earmarked to feed inmates, is now being investigated on allegations that he had sex with underage girls at drug-fueled parties in 1992.

Etowah County Sheriff Todd Entrekin is accused of hosting parties for other law enforcement officers and other adult men in the early nineties, where he and his friends allegedly had sex with teen girls, according to Alabama.com.

Mary Elizabeth Cross, 41, filed an incident report against Entrekin in May, which accuses him of second-degree rape. She claims that Entrekin had sex with her four times in 1992, when he was 29 and she was 15 years old. Cross also claims she witnessed Entrekin have sex with another teen girl and that Entrekin often gave her and other teens alcohol, cocaine and money.

"I was 15. It was right before my 16th birthday and I remember telling everyone I couldn't wait to turn 16 so I could drive," Cross told Alabama.com.

Entrekin vehemently denies the allegations.

"I've never had sex with any 15-year-old girl or had drugs around or anything. I have never done drugs in my life," Entrekin told Alabama.com, adding that he doesn’t know Cross. "That's the most absurd thing I've ever heard of. Never, ever has anything like that happened before."

On Friday, Etowah County District Attorney Jody Willoughby requested the State Bureau of Investigations to conduct a full investigation of the allegations, The Gadsden Times in Gadsden, Alabama reported.

Entrekin’s attorney, Donald Rhea, said in a statement that Entrekin also asked for the investigation.

Earlier this year, it was revealed that Entrekin pocketed more than $750,000 in funds that were earmarked to feed inmates over the past three years. He and his wife, Karen allegedly spent that money on a luxury beach home worth $740,000.

Keeping "excess" inmate-feeding funds is technically legal under a state law in Alabama. Many sheriffs, however, often turn in unused feeding funds to their county government.

[Photo: Etowah County Sheriff’s Office]

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