‘To Catch A Predator' Host Chris Hansen Turns Himself In To Police For Writing Bad Checks

Chris Hansen reportedly failed to pay for $13,000 worth of promotional materials and repeatedly wrote checks that bounced, driving a business owner in Connecticut to turn to police for help.

By Sharon Lynn Pruitt

Chris Hansen's next show might be "To Catch A Debtor."

The journalist, known to many as the host of mid-2000s hit “To Catch A Predator,” turned himself in to police on Monday after authorities issued an arrest warrant in relation to claims that he’d repeatedly written bad checks and failed to pay a local business owner thousands of dollars.

The 59-year-old television journalist and host reported to police in Stamford, Conn., where he was charged with issuing a bad check and released without bond after promising to appear in court, local outlet Greenwich Time reports.

Hansen’s trouble with the law comes after he allegedly failed on multiple occasions to pay $12,998.05 to Peter Psichopaidas, owner of Promotional Sales Limited, after ordering 355 ceramic mugs, 288 T-shirts and 650 vinyl decals that he planned to distribute at marketing events, according to an arrest affidavit obtained by the outlet.

Hansen received an invoice for the order in September 2017 and sent Psichopaidas a check for the entire amount three months later, the affidavit reportedly states. The check ultimately bounced, and even though Hansen apologized to Psichopaidas when confronted, he then wrote another bad check, this one for $13,200, in April, the Greenwich Times says.

After the second check bounced, Psichopaidas took his complaints to the police, Stamford Police confirmed to Oxygen.com. Hansen refused to discuss the situation with police, leading them to obtain a warrant for his arrest, authorities said.

Before police got involved, Hansen at one point made promises that his wife would pay the bill, but she did not show up either, according to the Greenwich Times. He also reportedly wrote to Psichopaidas on the day the second check bounced, offering an explanation.

“Peter ... I truly thought I had this covered,” Hansen is said to have written. “I am scrambling to get it done. Please give me till the end of the day. I sold a boat to cover the rest of this and need to pick up the payment this afternoon.”

Hansen was charged with a class D felony, People reports. He has not issued any comment on the charge.

Hansen, who most recently hosted “Crime Watch Daily” before its cancellation last summer, is recognized by many for his work with “To Catch A Predator,” the popular Dateline series that featured Hansen confronting would-be sex offenders who have been caught in the act of soliciting minors. The show, which offered a behind-the-scenes look at investigators luring and catching predators, premiered in 2004 and ran for three years before its cancellation in 2007.

[Photo: Stamford Police Department]

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